No People, No Wind

Born in Moscow in 1968, Yury Tsarevskiy was creative since elementary school but did not formally receive an art education at the university level. He preferred the way of the autodidact, avoiding imposed authority and dogma, learning on his own, trusting his intuition.

Using a rapidograf (technical pen) and some ink and paint, he creates landscapes with neat geometric details. The representational scenes look familiar to us because of their architectural and natural realism. But the atmosphere in the drawings is strange. An air of sterility pervades the pictures. There are no people, no birds, no wind. There are few signs of change or motion. This contrast is the artist’s intentional trick.

Yury appreciates the work of Albrecht Dürer, Koloman Moser, Egon Schiele, Alfred Kubin, Maurits Escher. Among the Russian artists, he likes Nikolai Samokish, Günther Reindorff and master of landscape etching Stanislav Nikireev. His aesthetics and artistic “worldview” is heavily inspired by the work of American precisionists (Charles Siler, Charles Demuth, Edmund Lewandowski) and Italian painters Giorgio De Chirico (metaphysical school) and Carlo Carrà (futurism).

Yury has participated in group exhibitions at the museum Central House of Artists and the international exhibition centre Crocus Expo in Moscow. In 2008, he displayed his work at the graphics and video art exhibition “Portholes” in Yekaterinburg. His works are held in several private collections in Russia.

You can find Yury at All drawings used with permission.





















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