Vanitas

Vanitas (Latin for “vanity” in its older sense, meaning “worthlessness” or “pointlessness”), was a popular theme in the art of 16th- and 17th-century Flanders and Netherlands (the concept emerges out of the book of Ecclesiastes in the Bible). Through rich symbolism, the paintings emphasised the inevitability of death (skulls, rotting food or flowers, extinguished candles), the brevity of earthly life (bubbles, hourglass, watches, musical instruments) – and with that, the futility of all pleasures. They often contained moralising angels.

 

Vanitas by Antonio de Pereda y Salgado, Wikipedia

 

Vanitas by Pier Francesco Cittadani, Wikipedia

 

Vanitas by Harmen Steenwijck, Wikipedia
Vanitas by Harmen Steenwijck, Wikipedia

 

Vanitas by Jan Sanders van Hemessen, Wikipedia
Vanitas by Jan Sanders van Hemessen, Wikipedia

 

Vanitas by Pieter Claesz, Wikipedia
Vanitas by Pieter Claesz, Wikipedia

 

Vanitas by Clara Peeters, Wikipedia
Vanitas by Clara Peeters, Wikipedia

 

Vanitas by Edward Collier
Vanitas by Edward Collier

 

Vanitas by Maria van Oosterwijck
Vanitas by Maria van Oosterwijck

 

Vanitas by Abraham Mignon, Wikipedia
Vanitas by Abraham Mignon, Wikipedia

 

Vanitas by Johann de Cordua, Wikipedia
Vanitas by Johann de Cordua, Wikipedia

 

Vanitas by Carstian Luyckx, Wikipedia
Vanitas by Carstian Luyckx, Wikipedia

 

Vanitas by Adriaen van Utrecht, Wikipedia
Vanitas by Adriaen van Utrecht, Wikipedia

 

 

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